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Yoga Pose Notebook: Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana (Revolved Head-to-Knee Pose)

 Parivrrta Janu Sirsaasana | Revolved Head to Knee Pose
{illustrations by MCKIBILLO}

Before we get to the post, a quick, shameless plug for my upcoming trainings. You can join me live at my 500-Hour Yoga Teacher Training in San Francisco, London, or Hong Kong. Learn more here here. Or I have three separate teacher trainings available online. Learn more about my Arm Balances, Sequencing, and Anatomy Online Courses here.

One Thing to Learn About Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana

You don’t have to press the sitting bone that you’re leaning away from in Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana into the floor. In fact, you may have a better all-around experience posture if you allow that sitting bone to lift up. Yes, you read that correctly. Here’s why:

The pelvis and spine work best when they work together. In fact, the pelvis and spine are so functionally integrated that I think of them as two parts of the same system when it comes to movement. When you do a forward bend with your spine, you do a forward bend with your pelvis (anterior tilt). When you do a backward bend with your spine, you do a backward bend with your pelvis (posterior tilt). There are a few minor exceptions and complications to this rule of thumb, but the logic is sound. In fact, if you take your pelvis and spine and move them in opposite directions you will typically produce excess compression and tension somewhere in the spine. And, while this may look fancy on Instagram, excess tension and compression at spinal junctions is not in anyone’s best interest, nor does it fall under the scope of teachings that we can fairly describe as “yoga.”

Since the spine and pelvis work best when they’re both sharing the same set of motions, I want you to experiment with lifting the sitting bone that you’re moving away from when you do Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana. You read that correctly. Experiment with lifting the opposite buttock slightly instead of pressing it down so that your pelvis can rotate laterally over your thigh bones slightly. You’ll still receive a big ‘ole side-stretch, you’ll produce more length in your spine, and chances are that you’ll reduce excess compression in the lower back and sacroilliac region on the side that you’re moving toward. In short, you’ll probably like it. A lot. If not, feel free to press both sitting bones down and keep it old school.

Use the illustration above to hone your pose and experiment with changing the alignment of your base. Enjoy.

SEQUENCING FOR PARIVRTTA JANU SIRSASANA

You can find a fully-illustrated, 16-pose sequence for Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana here.

WHERE CAN I LEARN MORE ABOUT ANATOMY, SEQUENCING, AND TEACHER TRAINING?

I offer both online trainings and live, in-the-flesh ones around the world. Here are a few of the courses that are currently open. (For a full schedule, go to my Schedule page):

Essential Anatomy E-Course

The Art of Yoga Sequencing E-Course

500-Hour Training in San Francisco (2018)

100-Hour Training in London (2018)

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Episode 62: The Bonus Ep in Which We Answer Your Summer Series Questions

Hi everyone!

On this special bonus episode, Jason and I answer your questions that came up during the summer series. Thanks, as always, for sending in your questions. It helps us plan episodes!

We talk about why the cue to keep the feet parallel in Wheel Pose came about (and is it really necessary?), I offer some help for hurting knees, ideas for strengthening the “pull muscles,” and Locust Pose alternatives during pregnancy.


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RECOMMENDED & RELATED LINKS
The Mother of All Backbends: Urdhva Dhanurasana
The Surprising Way to Deepen Your Backbends
Episode 23: Fun with Shoulder Anatomy
Episode 43: Sacroiliac Pain, Tailbone Cues, & Wonky Knees
Episode 54: What’s Missing From Your Hip-Focused Practices

WRITE A REVIEW
If you like the podcast, please leave a review or rating on iTunes! It makes it easier for others to find the podcast. If you don’t know how to leave a review, here are some step by step instructions. Woohoo! So easy!

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Episode 42: Maty Ezraty on Leading with Communication and Love

Maty Ezraty is a genuine pioneer of yoga in the U.S. One of the original co-founders of YogaWorks, Maty is a true teacher’s teacher. On this episode, Maty shares stories from her early days as well as how her practice has changed with age. She also shares her approach to mentoring teachers and students, which is an alchemy of communication, love, and meeting people where they are.

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RECOMMENDED & RELATED LINKS
Learn more about Maty and find her schedule on her web site: MatyEzraty.com

MUSIC
Velella_Velella — 3 To The 6 To The 0
Podington Bear — A1 Rogue
Shana Falana — Cloud Beats

WRITE A REVIEW
If you like the podcast, please leave a review or rating on iTunes! I’m learning that it really does help others find it and it helps me to know which episodes resonate with you! You can also follow me on Twitter @yogalandpodcast.

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Episode 23: Q & A with Jason – Fun with Shoulder Anatomy!

Hi everyone!

On this episode Jason answers three of our listener questions and it just so happens that they all focus on some aspect of shoulder anatomy. We also talk about cats a lot. Here are the questions:

* Why do we flex the ankle in poses like Reclined Pigeon?
* Is “pull the shoulder blades down” a “bad” alignment cue?
* In Plank Pose, do you push strongly through the arms and upper back? Or soften the shoulders?

We recognize that it can be difficult to listen to a conversation about anatomy without visuals. To help you out, I put links to some of the shoulder-oriented posts and sequences we have on the blog.

Subscribe via: iTunes | Acast | RSS

RECOMMENDED & RELATED LINKS
Essential Sequence: Neck, Shoulders, and Upper Back
The Expert’s Guide to Chaturanga:
Part I, A Shoulder Surgeon’s Guide to Keeping Your Shoulders Safe
Part II, 5 Poses to Make Your Chaturanga Strong and Steady
Part III, Best and Worst Modifications and Alternatives
Part IV, Best Tips for Transitioning Into Chaturanga
Part V, Why Chaturanga is Tough to Teach & What to Do About It
A Shoulder Opening Sequence to Forearm Balance
The Perfect Shoulderstand Prep

MUSIC
Poddington Bear — 60s Quiz Show

WRITE A REVIEW
If you like the podcast, please leave a review or rating on iTunes! I’m learning that it really does help others find it and it helps me to know which episodes resonate with you! You can also follow me on Twitter @yogalandpodcast.

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